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Muhammadu Buhari Becomes Nigeria's President

KPLU News - 1 hour 37 min ago
For the first time since Nigeria won its independence in 1960, the country has inaugurated an opposition figure as its next president.

Muhammadu Buhari, a retired general who ruled the country back in the '80s after a military coup, was sworn in as president of Nigeria on Friday.

The BBC reports:

"He has taken over from Goodluck Jonathan, who urged his successor to unite the country in the face of the threat from Boko Haram militants.

Seattle Arena Investor Hansen Looking For Teammate, Facing Hurdles

KPLU News - 1 hour 59 min ago

Investor Chris Hansen confirmed in interviews this week that he is looking for a new teammate in his Seattle arena project. Hansen's plan for a basketball and hockey arena in the SoDo district recently received a favorable Environmental Impact Statement.

But the process is far from over. KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel said there are bigger hurdles ahead, including the question of which sport should come first.

Amid Corruption Scandal, FIFA Will Hold Presidential Election

KPLU News - 3 hours 4 min ago
Just two days after a group of leading officials were arrested and charged with corruption and bribery, FIFA, soccer's world governing body, is holding a presidential election.

The Swiss Joseph "Sepp" Blatter, who has been FIFA's chief since 1998, is facing off with Prince Ali bin al-Hussein of Jordan, but don't expect a big shakeup.

Her

New Jersey Lassa Fever Death Reveals Holes In Ebola Monitoring System

KPLU News - 6 hours 13 min ago
This week a man died in New Jersey of a hemorrhagic fever. This by itself is fairly unusual in the Garden State. Making the case even more odd was that the man was being monitored for Ebola by New Jersey health officials and the case should have been caught earlier.

The events expose a hole in a public health system meant to track potential Ebola cases.

The 55-year-old New Jersey resident worked in the mining industry and traveled frequently to West Africa.

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

KPLU News - 6 hours 16 min ago
Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

Last year, the lack of diversity on author panels at BookCon spawned the We Need Diverse Books campaign, which in turn sparked renewed conversation about the lack of diversity in publishing.

On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines' Combat Readiness

KPLU News - 6 hours 17 min ago
On the shores of California one recent morning, female Marines were heaving heavy chains to secure amphibious assault vehicles that soon would roll into the waves.

The exercise was one part of a yearlong experiment aimed at settling the question of whether women can handle the punishing world of ground combat.

Told by the Pentagon that it must open combat roles for women by 2016 — unless it can show a good reason not to — the Marine Corps has partnered with the University of Pitt

It All Came Down To 'Nunatak'

KPLU News - 6 hours 36 min ago
I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia.

Federal Maritime Regulator Says Tacoma And Seattle Port Alliance Is A `Great Idea’

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 16:49

The cargo shipping industry is in the midst of big changes and that’s prompting the ports of Seattle and Tacoma to forge an alliance.

Federal Maritime Commission Chairman Mario Cordero, the top regulator of the nation's ports, says the alliance is a "great idea."

Cholera Surges In Haiti As Rain Arrives Early

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 15:41
At a government-run clinic in Diquini, near Port-au-Prince, doctors are treating a handful of cholera patients.

One of them is Givenchi Predelus. For five days, the high school sophomore has been lying on a cot with a towel over his midsection and an IV in his arm, listening to tinny music on his bare-bones cellphone.

Predelus speaks in a whisper, a sign of what cholera has done to his strength. "Only one other person in my area has cholera," he says, through an interrupter. "She sells patties on the side of the road.

Former House Speaker Hastert Indicted In Probe Into $3.5M In Withdrawals

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 15:24
Former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert was indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury in Chicago. The Illinois Republican, 73, is charged with trying to evade cash withdrawal requirements, and with lying to the FBI about it.

According to the U.S.

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 15:15
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still trying to figure out how the military managed to ship anthrax spores that were apparently live from one of its facilities to more than a dozen labs across the United States.

"We have a team at the [military] lab to determine what may have led to this incident," says CDC spokesman Jason McDonald.

For Juvenile Sex Offenders, State Registries Create Lifetime Of Problems

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 15:15
Forrest Hampton is about to become a family man and he couldn't be happier. He's 25 and he lives in a suburb of Dallas with his fiancée, who's due to have their baby practically any minute. They've already picked out a name: Raven.

In most ways they are a normal family. Except for one thing. Until last year, Hampton was a registered sex offender.

"I honestly don't believe I was supposed to be registered in the first place," he says, "but I wasn't in the position to fight my case."

That's because Hampton was found guilty at age 13 of having sexual contact with a 9-year-old girl.

Cod Comeback: How The North Sea Fishery Bounced Back From The Brink

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 15:15
Cod love the icy cold waters of the North Sea — and British people love eating cod.

But a decade ago, it looked like people were eating the fish to the brink of collapse.

Something's Spawning On Appalachia's Forest Farms

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 14:45
Many farmers in Appalachia are cultivating food not in big open fields but deep in the forest — where ramps, hazelnuts and maple trees for syrup thrive.

But some would like to see the region producing even more forest-grown products — in particular, mushrooms — to meet growing demand at specialty food stores and restaurants that serve local ingredients.

The catch?

Drug Overdose, On The Rise, Cropping Up As Campaign Issue

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 14:23
As presidential candidates visit the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire, they're hearing about heroin and meth. Drug overdoses now kill more Americans than traffic accidents. And, in many places, there's a growing acceptance that this isn't just a problem for other people.

New Hampshire is in the throes of a crisis. Last year more than 300 people in the small state died of drug overdoses.

Why A Journalist Scammed The Media Into Spreading Bad Chocolate Science

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 14:23
Earlier this spring, headlines around the world trumpeted an exciting bit of news that seemed too good to be true: "Eating that bar of chocolate can HELP you lose weight," as Britain's Daily Mail put it.

From India to Australia and Texas to Germany, news organizations shared findings published in the International Archives of Medicine in late March.

The problem? The study they were based on was pure junk.

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 14:23
Entrepreneur Petar Vujosevic was just a regular guy who saw a big problem with the way the hiring system works.

Typically, a hiring manager posts an opening, describes the ideal candidate and resumes come flooding in.

FCC Chairman Wants To Help Low Income Americans Afford Broadband

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 14:18
A government program called Lifeline subsidizes basic phone service for low-income people. Now, the head of the Federal Communications Commission also wants to use the program to pay for broadband Internet connections, which many poor people lack.

When it comes to the Internet, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says there are the haves and the have nots. Ninety-five percent of households with incomes over $150,000 a year have broadband access, he says.

What We Know About Tattoo Reactions Only Goes Skin-Deep

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 13:24
For about as long as there have been humans, it seems there have been tattoos.

Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old mummy discovered in the Alps in 1991, had 61 tattoos covering his body. And a quick look around the local coffee shop reveals they're just about as popular today. By one estimate, about a quarter of U.S. adults have at least one tattoo.

Yet doctors say we still don't understand the full extent of the skin's reaction to tattoos.

Does Less Latin Mean Dumbing Down? France Debates School Reform

KPLU News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 13:06
Reforming the education system in any country can be tricky. But in France, where learning is highly centralized and public school (l'ecole de la Republique) a symbol of French greatness, it's all but impossible.

Several French presidents have tried and failed.