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Just Back From Spain, Nancy Leson Offers A Few Pointers On Paella

KPLU News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Both Nance and I have been traveling these past weeks. I traveled across Canada by train, and Nancy went to Spain and France with the KPLU Travel Club. While there, she and her fellow eaters tried their hands at the iconic Valencia dish, paella.

How One Theologian Managed To Keep Her Faith Through Struggles With Depression

KPLU News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Monica Coleman has an impressive resume (bachelor’s degree from Harvard, master’s of divinity from Vanderbilt, Ph.D. from Claremont School of Theology), and she doesn’t shy away from talking about tough or deeply personal things.

She’s spoken out about her own trauma of having been raped and her disappointment with the inept and sometimes callous response from church leaders to victims of sexual violence.

But as open as Coleman has been about her experience as a victim of sexual assault, there was another part of herself she kept hidden for years — her struggle with debilitating depression.

Seattle Voters To Decide On Monorail Plans — Again

KPLU News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Seattle voters have a monorail proposal on their ballots this year. The city's last public monorail effort died in 2005. Now, supporters hope to revive the idea.

Seattle Leaders Hope 'Magic Sauce' Will Guarantee 'Quality' In Proposed Pre-K Plan

KPLU News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Seattle's elected leaders can hardly describe the proposed preschool pilot program at the heart of Proposition 1B without using the phrase "high-quality."

City education officials frequently invoke these words when speaking about their desire to pass a four-year, $58 million property tax hike to not only cover preschool tuition for as many as 2,000 low-income kids, but to ensure these children receive the greatest possible benefit from the program.

But amid a broader debate over whether voters ought to choose the city's plan over a competing childcare initiative, Proposition 1A, a smaller debate has roiled among early educators: What exactly constitutes "high-quality" preschool?

Highline Schools The Latest Wash. District To Consider Transgender Student Policy

KPLU News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Where should a transgender student in a public school use the restroom? In which locker room should the student shower or change clothes? And how should a teacher refer to a student: as a he, a she, or neither?

The Highline Public Schools Board will vote Wednesday night on a new, formal set of guidelines to help staff answer these questions.

Washington Supreme Court Hears Arguments In Backpage.com Case

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 16:56

The fate of a human-trafficking lawsuit against Backpage.com is now in the hands of the Washington Supreme Court. The justices heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that involves three underage victims of sex trafficking. The justices must decide if the lawsuit can proceed.

You Definitely Need This Condo Pony, And Other Products From 'SkyMaul'

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 16:27
If you're midflight and the movie is terrible and the airline magazine crossword puzzle has already been done by someone else, the SkyMall catalog is the time-killer of last resort for the bored, boxed-in passenger.

SkyMall sells items that, under normal circumstances, you might never consider — like say, adult-size, unisex, one-piece Superman pajamas.

In More Cities, That Doggie In The Window Is Not For Sale

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:57
Just about everyone loves puppies. But around the country, there's heated disagreement about where, and from whom, people can get one.

While the large national pet store chains don't sell dogs, other chains and shops do. But in several states, including Florida, cities are passing laws that ban puppy sales in pet stores.

At the Petland store in Plantation, Fla., a suburb of Ft. Lauderdale, customers come in all day long to look at and play with the puppies.

Duke Energy CEO: 'I Don't Think Of Myself As A Powerful Woman'

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:57
The first time I meet Lynn Good, she's tucked behind a set of doors with her bags, calmly waiting for the hotel's fire alarms to stop bleating.

She's at Fortune's Most Powerful Women Summit in California to speak, even though, she says, "I don't think of myself as a powerful woman."

It occurs to me later that the unexpected run-in is a fitting introduction to a woman whose corporate ascent has been marked by some emergency detours.

"There's nothing about Lynn Good at age 30 or age 35 that would have said, 'I am setting my sights on being a CEO,' " she says.

But at age 55, she

Model Remembers Oscar De La Renta As An 'Extraordinary Gentleman'

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:55
Bethann Hardison was one of the "spiritual mothers of the supermodels who ruled the '90s," and she credited some of her rise to prominence to Oscar de la Renta, the influential Dominican-born fashion designer who died this week at the age of 82.

"I was more of a new wave looking kind of girl: much more ethnic, natural, short haircut — so it was quite different then others who looked more like young women," Hardison told NPR's Audie Cornish on Tuesday's All Things Considered.

Missouri Governor Announces Creation Of 'Ferguson Commission'

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:35
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced on Tuesday that he was forming a panel that would study the social and economic conditions that fueled violent protests in Ferguson, Mo., over the killing of an unarmed 18-year-old this summer.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

"'Legitimate issues have been raised by thoughtful voices on all sides. Shouting past one another will not move us to where we need to go,' said Mr.

Watchdog: $7 Billion U.S. Effort Doesn't Dent Afghan Poppy Production

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:34
The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) has some more bad news for U.S. taxpayers: The $7.6 billion the United States has spent on its counternarcotic efforts in Afghanistan has done little to reduce poppy production.

In fact, quite the opposite has happened because in 2013, the cultivation levels of poppy in Afghanistan hit an all-time high.

In a letter to top U.S.

My Son Is Doctors Without Borders' Thousandth Ebola Survivor

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:25
Saturday, the 21st of September, is a day I will never forget in my life.

I was out working with MSF [Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders] as a health promotion officer in Foya, in the north of Liberia, visiting villages and telling people about Ebola: how to protect themselves and their families, what to do if they start to develop symptoms and making sure everyone has the MSF hotline number to call.

Later that night, my brother called me. "Your wife has died." I said, "What?" He said, "Bendu is dead."

I dropped the phone. I threw it away and it broke apart.

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:24
The World Health Organization says that efforts are on track to distribute an experimental Ebola vaccine in West Africa in January.

Two potential vaccines are now being tested for safety in people, and Russia is developing another one. While quantities will be limited, scientists say even a relatively small supply of vaccine can help bring the epidemic under control.

There's no guarantee that any vaccine will be effective, so it's good that several are in the pipeline.

From NFL To 'Scandal,' Whole Foods Buys TV Ads To Boost Its Brand

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 15:24

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DCow4J-pDE

Israeli Homes, Decorated With A Shopping Spree In China

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:53
Adi Asulin lives in a fabulous apartment on the top floor of a seven-story building in the Israeli town of Ra'anana, north of Tel Aviv. The entry hall is long and light. Windows open onto an enormous balcony, which wraps around three sides of her home. The decor is fresh and white.

"It's all made in China," Asulin says.

Not just made in China.

American Freed After Months Of Detention In North Korea

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:52
Updated at 1:35 p.m.

More Insurers Put Spending Limits On Medical Treatments

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:52
To clamp down on health care costs, a growing number of employers and insurers are putting limits on how much they'll pay for certain medical services such as knee replacements, lab tests and complex imaging.

A recent study found that savings from such moves may be modest, however, and some analysts question whether "reference pricing," as it's called, is good for consumers.

The California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), which administers the health insurance benefits for 1.4 million state workers, retirees and their families, has one of the

Who's Catching Your Cellphone Conversations?

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:51
With the right equipment, people can hijack your cellphone, listen to your calls and read your texts, alarming privacy rights advocates and tech experts alike.

We know the eavesdropping is happening, but we don't know much about who's doing the listening. The police and other law enforcement agencies do it, but they have been restricted by the FBI from telling us about it. Beyond the police, the listeners could be the U.S.

Does Being 'Spiritual But Not Religious' Really Mean Anything?

KPLU News - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:35
"Spiritual But Not Religious" is a phrase you hear more and more these days — and with good reason. In 2012, a Pew Foundation survey on religion found that almost 20 percent of Americans placed themselves in the category of "unaffiliated."

That 20 percent unaffiliated translates into a whole lot of people.